Roads & Transportation

MateenBar is the ideal reinforcement for concrete roads and bridges, as it is fully corrosion resistant and lightweight.

Applications

  • bridge decks & barrier walls
  • expansion and contraction joints
  • approach slabs
  • mechanically stabilized earth (MSE) walls

When used in road and bridge slabs or in concrete barrier walls in aggressive environments, corrosion attack by de-icing salts, saline environment, weather and chemicals can be eliminated.

Structures with MateenBar can be designed lighter as the concrete cover can be reduced, thereby reducing the strength required in other structural members.

MateenBar is a quarter the weight of steel reinforcement. This allows construction to be safer and quicker by reducing the requirement for heavy lifting equipment on site.

Epoxy coated dowel bars have been found to be unsuitable due to nodal corrosion (aggressive corrosion concentrating at points) and have been banned by US Transportation authorities.
The significant costs in shutting down a transport network due to concrete failure lead to transportation authorities now budgeting based on whole-of-life costing rather than just upfront costs.

Project examples

  • Continuously Reinforced Concrete Road - Yreka, CA, U.S.A
  • Lusail Expressway project - Qatar
  • Shahama-Saadiyat Freeway packages 1 & 2 - U.A.E
  • Dowel bars in Highway Project - France
  • Messaieed Bridges - Qatar

Case Studies

Northside Storage Tunnel - Sydney, Australia (1998 - 2000)

The Northside Storage Tunnel was built in Sydney, Australia (1998-2000) from the suburb of Lane Cove (Western Sydney) to North Head. The total tunnel length was in excess of 20km, with diameters from 3.8 meters to 6.6 meters, a total excavation of 750,000m3 of ground and a project cost of USD 400 million.

Read more about this project ›

Singapore MRT - Singapore (2002)

During the construction of the Singapore MRT underground stations, various concrete walls and columns had to be built in the path of the Tunnel Boring Machine (TBM) prior to tunnelling.

Read more about this project ›

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